Hemobilia: A Rare Case of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed

U.V.Bharath Sabrish *

Bharati Vidhyapeeth (Deemed to Be) University Medical College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra, India.

D.G. Mote

Bharati Vidhyapeeth (Deemed to Be) University Medical College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra, India.

A.Mohan Abhinav

Bharati Vidhyapeeth (Deemed to Be) University Medical College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra, India.

Ananthu Sahadevan

Bharati Vidhyapeeth (Deemed to Be) University Medical College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra, India.

Umesh Mahadev Avarade

Bharati Vidhyapeeth (Deemed to Be) University Medical College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Hemobilia is a rare but important cause of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage that refers to bleeding from and/or into the biliary tract. Hepatic artery aneurysmal rupture is one of cause for the hemobilia. The common visceral aneurysm with the highest reported rate of rupture is Hepatic Artery Aneurysm (HAA). Depending on the size of the aneurysm, clinical manifestations include epigastric pain, biliary tract obstruction, gastrointestinal (GI) bleed, aneurysm rupture and death. HAA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.002%–0.4% of which 50 % is hepatic pseudo aneurysm. In this case report ,we discussed a case of 55years female with complains of abdominal pain for 15days , yellowish discolouration of skin and sclera for 15days and multiple episodes of hematemesis with Malena  for 2 days.

Keywords: Haemobilia, upper G.I bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, endovascular coiling


How to Cite

Sabrish, U.V.Bharath, D.G. Mote, A.Mohan Abhinav, Ananthu Sahadevan, and Umesh Mahadev Avarade. 2024. “Hemobilia: A Rare Case of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed”. Asian Journal of Case Reports in Surgery 7 (1):218-21. https://journalajcrs.com/index.php/AJCRS/article/view/525.

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